MAY WRAP UP

Hello! I know that this is a little late, but I can finally say that I have finished my University Degree! May was incredibly hectic and stressful for me. That being said, I now have all summer to read (and learn driving theory). Despite having numerous assignments to complete in May, I was able to read 11 books!!! Not only that, but they were all pretty good (mostly 4 and 5-star ratings!).

  1. The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood 

RATING – 5/5 Stars

2. The Nickel Boys – Colson Whitehead

RATING – 5/5 stars

3. The Starless Sea – Erin Morgenstern 

RATING – 5/5 Stars

4. They called us enemy – George Takei 

RATING – 4/5 STARS

5. Hey Wait – Jason 

RATING – 5/5 Stars

6. Circe – Madeline Miller 

Rating – 4/5 Stars

7. Saga Volume 1 

Rating – 4/5 Stars

8. #Girlboss – Sophia Amoruso

RATING – 3,5/5 Stars

9. All Your Perfects – Collen Hoover 

RATING – 4/5 Stars

10. Shadow of Night – Deborah Harkness 

Rating – 4/5 Stars

11. The Sense of an Ending – Julian Barnes 

RATING – 5/5 Stars

INSTAGRAM – GLOBALBOOKMANIA

GOODREADS – Katerina Turner 

The Complete Maus – Art Spiegleman

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SYNOPSIS 

Combined for the first time here are Maus I: A Survivor’s Tale and Maus II – the complete story of Vladek Spiegelman and his wife, living and surviving in Hitler’s Europe. By addressing the horror of the Holocaust through cartoons, the author captures the everyday reality of fear and is able to explore the guilt, relief and extraordinary sensation of survival – and how the children of survivors are in their own way affected by the trials of their parents. A contemporary classic of immeasurable significance.

GOODREADS RATING – 4.55/5 STARS 

REVIEW 

This is a must-read for everyone! Spiegelman approaches themes of memory, genocide, war, relationships, ethics and identity with a lot of respect and in a truly beautiful way. 

Individuals are represented as either mice or cats (or dogs and pigs) through the masks they wear. By representing humans as animals, it strips everyone’s humanity to a certain degree and reminds us as readers that people’s actions were not always their own choice due to the inherent need to survive. Identity is a construct and can be manipulated. The concept is brilliant, but in terms of the graphics, it sometimes became confusing or fuzzy because of the number of graphics on each page.  

Spiegelman’s graphic novel depicts both the hardships of the Holocaust that his father (Vladek) has experience alongside his own guilt as a second-generation survivor. Art tries to understand his father and respect his past. This is shown through a few real photographs. This hit me hard as it reminded me that although the graphics are beautiful, this story tells the life of real people and a real family. 

RATING – 5/5 STARS!

INSTAGRAM – GLOBALBOOKMANIA

GOODREADS -KATERINA TURNER 

The Complete Persepolis – Marjane Satrapi

The Complete Persepolis (Persepolis, #1-4) by Marjane Satrapi

SYNOPSIS 

Here, in one volume: Marjane Satrapi’s best-selling, internationally acclaimed graphic memoir.

Persepolis is the story of Satrapi’s unforgettable childhood and coming of age within a large and loving family in Tehran during the Islamic Revolution; of the contradictions between private life and public life in a country plagued by political upheaval; of her high school years in Vienna facing the trials of adolescence far from her family; of her homecoming–both sweet and terrible; and, finally, of her self-imposed exile from her beloved homeland. It is the chronicle of a girlhood and adolescence at once outrageous and familiar, a young life entwined with the history of her country yet filled with the universal trials and joys of growing up.

GOODREADS RATING – 4.39/5 STARS

REVIEW

This is an incredibly powerful graphic novel about a young woman growing up amidst the Islamic revolution in Tehran, Iran. Through various political issues, conflicts and personal exile, the protagonist, Marjane, develops into an intelligent and brave woman. We see Marjane from a young age as someone who is devoutly religious and has a lovely relationship her family, especially her grandmother and uncle. Throughout the novel, we see Marjane move abroad, struggle with her teenage years, struggle with exile, struggle with dehumanisation. Alongside this, we also see her experience her first love, her attending university as a woman in Iran, and many more accomplishments. The art is brilliant and if you are interested their is also a movie adaptation of this novel that uses the same art/graphics. This book really contemplates the battle between modern and traditional values and the political beliefs of Iran. Definitely a must-read! 

Rating 5/5 Stars

INSTAGRAM – GLOBALBOOKMANIA

GOODREADS – KATERINA TURNER 

The Moomins and The Great Flood by Tove Jansson

SYNOPSIS

The Moomins and the Great Flood is the first book about the Moomins, originally published in 1945. It´s the story about Moominmamma and Moomintroll´s search for the missing Moominpappa and how they found their way to the Moominvalley.

GOODREADS RATING – 4.03/5 STARS

REVIEW

I read this book a while ago for one of my university modules. I really enjoyed the artwork – it was beautiful. I had never heard of Tove Jansson before, or the Moomins, so it was certainly an interesting read. The language was simple and seeing as this is a translation, I can imagine the writing is more lyrical in it’s original Swedish. The story follows a lot of small adventures with many characters joining and leaving along the way. The fact that this was published in 1945, goes to show how Tove Jansson represented exile during war as a key theme throughout the book. Overall – definitely read this, because it’s short, entertaining and memorable.

RATING – 4,5/5 STARS

INSTAGRAM – GLOBALBOOKMANIA

GOODREADS – KATERINA TURNER