Song for Night – Chris Abani

960213

SYNOPSIS 

“Not since Jerzy Kosinski’s The Painted Bird or Agota Kristof’s Notebook Trilogy has there been such a harrowing novel about what it’s like to be a young person in a war. That Chris Abani is able to find humanity, mercy, and even, yes, forgiveness, amid such devastation is something of a miracle.”—Rebecca Brown, author of The End of Youth

“The moment you enter these pages, you step into a beautiful and terrifying dream. You are in the hands of a master, a literary shaman. Abani casts his spell so completely—so devastatingly—you emerge cleansed, redeemed, and utterly haunted.”—Brad Kessler, author of Birds in Fall

Part Inferno, part Paradise Lost, and part Sunjiata epic, Song for Night is the story of a West African boy soldier’s lyrical, terrifying, yet beautiful journey through the nightmare landscape of a brutal war in search of his lost platoon. The reader is led by the voiceless protagonist who, as part of a land mine-clearing platoon, had his vocal chords cut, a move to keep these children from screaming when blown up and thereby distracting the other minesweepers. The book is written in a ghostly voice, with each chapter headed by a line of the unique sign language these children invented. This book is unlike anything else ever written about an African war.

Chris Abani is a Nigerian poet and novelist and the author of The Virgin of FlamesBecoming Abigail (a New York Times Editor’s Choice), and GraceLand (a selection of the Today Show Book Club and winner of the 2005 PEN/Hemingway Prize and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award). His other prizes include a PEN Freedom to Write Award, a Prince Claus Award, and a Lannan Literary Fellowship. He lives and teaches in California.

GOODREADS RATING – 3.98/5 STARS

REVIEW 

This book broke me! Abani’s writing is so beautiful and haunting that once you pick this book up you won’t be able to put it back down. Chris Abani presents a very realistic depiction of a young man named My Luck, who is a mine diffuser and a child soldier. Straight off the bat, Abani describes the physical mutilation that child soldiers experienced wherein their vocal cords were cut so that they could not scream and alert the enemy of their presence. The rest of the book follows My Luck as he tracks down his platoon and remembers how he got to where he is now. The horrors Abani describes are hard to read about and yet, you can’t help but read them. I would recommend this to everyone but perhaps aged 18+. This book covers a lot of heavy and adult themes that may be unsuitable for a younger audience.

Rating 5/5 STARS!

INSTAGRAM – GLOBALBOOKMANIA

GOODREADS – KATERINA TURNER

 

 

The Complete Persepolis – Marjane Satrapi

The Complete Persepolis (Persepolis, #1-4) by Marjane Satrapi

SYNOPSIS 

Here, in one volume: Marjane Satrapi’s best-selling, internationally acclaimed graphic memoir.

Persepolis is the story of Satrapi’s unforgettable childhood and coming of age within a large and loving family in Tehran during the Islamic Revolution; of the contradictions between private life and public life in a country plagued by political upheaval; of her high school years in Vienna facing the trials of adolescence far from her family; of her homecoming–both sweet and terrible; and, finally, of her self-imposed exile from her beloved homeland. It is the chronicle of a girlhood and adolescence at once outrageous and familiar, a young life entwined with the history of her country yet filled with the universal trials and joys of growing up.

GOODREADS RATING – 4.39/5 STARS

REVIEW

This is an incredibly powerful graphic novel about a young woman growing up amidst the Islamic revolution in Tehran, Iran. Through various political issues, conflicts and personal exile, the protagonist, Marjane, develops into an intelligent and brave woman. We see Marjane from a young age as someone who is devoutly religious and has a lovely relationship her family, especially her grandmother and uncle. Throughout the novel, we see Marjane move abroad, struggle with her teenage years, struggle with exile, struggle with dehumanisation. Alongside this, we also see her experience her first love, her attending university as a woman in Iran, and many more accomplishments. The art is brilliant and if you are interested their is also a movie adaptation of this novel that uses the same art/graphics. This book really contemplates the battle between modern and traditional values and the political beliefs of Iran. Definitely a must-read! 

Rating 5/5 Stars

INSTAGRAM – GLOBALBOOKMANIA

GOODREADS – KATERINA TURNER